Exporting a UK-bought LHD car to France

Tracey, a British expat living in Brittany, contacted us to ask the following question: I am thinking of exporting a UK-bought LHD car to France. The car would be registered in Poland. Is this possible? How difficult would it be? EXPORTING A UK BOUGHT LHD CAR TO...

Driving in France

In recent years, travelling to the continent and driving in France has become increasingly easy for Brits. Both the Channel Tunnel and the various ferry companies offer numerous options. We live in Swindon and usually use the Portsmouth - Le Havre crossing. It offers...

Mushroom picking in France

Autumn, mushroom picking season Mid-October is upon us, and autumn is already well on its way... glorious golden colours abound in the countryside. A real feast for the senses: bright yellows, oranges, rich reds and browns so pleasing to the eye. The earthy and musty...

Pineau … or Pinot? Do you know the difference?

What is the difference between Pineau and Pinot? When I first met my wife's family in France, I had never heard of Pineau. When I did hear of it, I thought people were referring to Pinot – as in Pinot Grigio, which I love! But I did not realise there is a great...

Mushrooming in Monteneuf forest

An unexpected visitor (original post by Nicola) There was a terrific storm yesterday in the Ploërmel area. I had just put another log on the fire this afternoon when there was a knock at the door. Since yesterday was a bank holiday, we were rather startled: generally,...
Simon Pocock

Simon Pocock

Because the season is late this year all the local farmers are desperate to plant their maize crops.

We have 4  farmers around us and it’s as if they are in a competition to get their crop in first. Two of them had to cut the grass (it’s obligatory in France to have a green crop over the winter to reduce leaching of nitrates into the water course) and make hay, which they either made into large bales or picked it up loose and ensiled it (the storage of fodder in a silo for preservation).

All farmers seem have differing techniques of breaking up the soil  before ploughing it up, for example, using big disc or spring tines. We have one day when they spread farm yard manure or spray slurry. This is extremely smelly, but it doesn’t last long – we just have to make sure we don’t hang the washing outside that day. Then they have to wait for the contractor with the maize drill who needs to work 24/7 to catch up with the log jam of work.

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