Covid complications causing concerns

Martin and Nadine haven’t been to France since January, and Covid complications certainly are an issue and a constant worry. It seems sorting out a ferry crossing isn’t the only hurdle. Is it better to go or to cancel?

Requirements for driving in France – Breath Test Kits

On 1st July 2012, a law was introduced in France: all drivers had to carry a breath test kit in their car. Find out why and if or how that law was implemented. Read more about the driving requirements in France.

Kouign-amann vs Lardy cake

Kouign-amann is a beautiful, buttery, traditional Breton cake. During the current lockdown, unable to travel to Brittany, we have found an alternative: the British lardy cake. Read on.

Exporting a UK-bought LHD car to France

Is it possible or indeed practical to buy a LHD car in the UK, originally registered in Poland, and then import it to France? Are there guidelines to be followed?

Driving in France

In recent years, travelling across to the continent and driving in France has become increasingly easy for Brits, but there are laws and regulations to bear in mind while driving abroad.

Joe suffers from nosebleeds. They always occur during the night and are worse during the summer months and at the moment he is having three or four a week.

Our doctor has recommended an operation. I am not keen.

Unusual doctor surgery in France

Unusual doctor surgery in France

Yesterday I made an appointment with a different doctor. We have found that with most things… if there are two ways of doing something, the French will do it one way, the English another. Usually, the best way would be to amalgamate the two practices!

This is true with medical care. The bureaucracy involved in setting up the paperwork to allow you to get into the French medical system is HUGE… it took us four years but once you are in, the care is second to none. For example, doctors tend to work on their own, there are not huge practices that you get in the UK. In France, you are not tied to a particular doctor and of course, doctors specialise or have interests in various areas of medicine, so you could see one GP for an arthritic problem, another for controlling asthma and another for diabetes. This is all perfectly normal in France. The risk here is that your medical notes are all over the place, and in France, it is the patient’s responsibility to advise each doctor what medication they are taking.

Homeopathic Doctor in France

Well, I heard of a doctor in Caro, he is a conventional GP but he also advises on homeopathy and alternative medicine. So off we go.

I follow the directions and find this building. Could this be the surgery? Yes, there is a plaque by the door.

Doctors waiting room in France

Doctors waiting room in France

We go in. The building is deserted. The front door leads straight into a deserted waiting room.

Does anyone know we are here? Whilst we wait I look around. On the notice board, there is a list of services that the doctor provides. I gather that his wife is a midwife and she offers postnatal and gynecological services as well.

Paying for medical treatment in France

Another huge difference in France is that you have to pay for each consultation but most/all of the charges can be claimed back. Hypnosis and verruca removal are also offered!

Doctors price list in France

Doctors price list in France

After five minutes the doctor arrives and we are led into his office. He examines Joe and prescribes two sorts of Arnica for the nosebleeds. He notices that Joe also suffers from hay fever and offers two different sorts of homeopathic granules for his hay fever instead of the conventional medicine he is currently using. He advised, homeopathy doesn’t work for everyone or for every condition, for example, he explains I do not recommend homeopathic treatments for lowering blood pressure but we can try it for hay fever and if it doesn’t work Joe can go back to the conventional treatment.

I am impressed with this doctor, he seems to be effectively combining conventional and alternative medicine.

We go to the pharmacy and leave with 4 brightly coloured tubes of homeopathic granules which (as with all conventional medicines) are free of charge (this applies to adults as well).

We now have to wait and see if the nosebleeds stop…

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